The Hour of the Pig
("The Advocate" in the US/Canada)
(A film discussion on Spring in January-February

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Part 2
Part 3

 
Arami:
Spare yourself the trouble. The image, although suggestive, is quite discreet. 

Karen:
If The Hour of the Pig was initially rated NC-17, then was the full CF on view?
 

A couple of questions: 
(1) What kind of animal was it that Filette was cuddling? 
(2) What fruit did Richard select at the banquet? 
As always, inquiring minds want to know!

Marcia:
(1) A tiny monkey, a marmoset of some sort. 
(2) A grape, I believe. 
 

Arami:
(Karen) If The Hour of the Pig was initially rated NC-17, then was the full CF on view?
Well, not that full. There is no known full and complete frontal of CF in existence in public domain. And somehow I doubt it will ever be. And if it is, then I reserve the right to review the whole question. :-) 

Renate:
What are your three favourite scenes?

(a)  comedy moments 
(b)  in court 
(c)  love scenes
(d)  most interesting in terms of acting
(e)  most interesting in terms of looks
(f)  most interesting in terms of script idea
(g)  any unexpected moments
(h)  favourite lines 
Does Richard Courtois have any keepsakes you would like? 
 
Arami:
(Renate) What are your three favourite scenes?

I always find it difficult to choose. But the cock crowing is probably among them. And the bagpipes. And... and... 


 
Heide:
(a) comedy moments
- The dog, "Good God, that dog smiled at me."

- When Filette grabbed his hand and put it on her breast. It stayed there a little long.

- His expression when he saw his comely traveling companion on his return to Paris.

(b) in court
- His look of disbelief and then his little laugh when Donald Pleasence says, "The pig ate a portion of his body although it was Friday."

(c) love scenes
I actually prefer his scenes with Maria though I wouldn't call them love scenes. I didn't really think there was much chemistry with Samira though I liked when he's hovering over her, about to (ahem) remove himself and she says, "Stay." 
 

(d) most interesting in terms of acting
I liked the courtroom scenes when he realizes he's being screwed by the Ponthieu laws—his disbelief, frustration and then sadness because he won't be able to get the woman off. 

(e) most interesting in terms of looks
Ooh, those angry stares at Jehan d'Auferre when he realizes his relationship with Samira could be used against him and when he strides in with those long legs to tell the Seigneur he knows it is his son who is the killer. 

(g) any unexpected moments
How about unexplained ones? I still don't get the reason why the spy for the Inquisition was there and why he was always in the right place. 

(h) favourite lines
- Filette about Richard: "The cell I would put him in is warm indeed and he would wish never to come out again." And then her mother: "You are too forward, young woman!"

- To Samira: "What are you doing to me? You disturb me."
 
 
 
 

(Renate) Does Richard Courtois have any keepsakes you would like?
Oh, may I have his towel? The one he rubs all over his wet body at the baths.

How about your favorite hat? Could there be one? 

Bethan:
One of my favourites. I could freeze frame every other shot.
 

(e) looks
- His anguished look when he is slightly drunk and smashes the replica of his house. 

- The way he smiles after he can't remember the rest of the quotation "Thou art beautiful..." 

- In conversation with Samira: "You could buy another one...half a year." Love the way he says "oh."

- Looking at Maria after calling her Samira: "What did I say?" 

- And waking up after his dream...to the final cock crow!
 

- Huge close-ups as he is unlacing his jacket as he thinks about the fate of the witch
...and when he says, "Albertus, is there something I should know?"

Trina:
I've seen quite a few of Colin's movies and, other than P&P, The Advocate is my favorite. Being an agnostic, I love movies that poke fun at religion (especially Christianity, no offense to any believers). I thought TA combined a great story with humor, a bit of suspense and intrigue, some romance, and of course Colin.

Here are some of my favorite moments: 
 
- In the opening carriage scene, when Courtois wakes up from his dream and says, "Did I make a noise?"
- When they first arrive in town and the actors are performing the bawdy street play.
 

- When the cock crows and Maria sticks her foot through the wall. 

- All the scenes when Courtois is roaming around at night in the black leather pants and those strange, held-together-with-string jackets. He looks so manly, and he's not wearing those awful hats. 
 

- The exchange with the priest.
Courtois: There must be priests in Hell.

Priest: You can't move for them.

- The Seigneur's seriously dysfunctional family. 

- The little laugh from Courtois about the pig eating flesh on Friday. 

Lastly, I have one question. On my tape, it seems like there's dialogue bleeped out. When Courtois is at the Seigneur's and he comes in the room and Filette drops her dress and starts braying, he says something, but there's no sound. Is that just a defect or is it bleeped out in the American version? 

Arami:
(Trina) I love movies that poke fun at religion (especially Christianity...)
I guess that's because of all major religions, Christians are the least likely to pass a death sentence on the offenders! :-) However, I cannot resist a small correction. I think we should talk of poking fun at human faults and weaknesses in the context of religion, not religion per se. 

Renate:
Such an adorable smile! HOTPIG was only my third CF film after P&P and AMITC (except COF and TEP), and in both he is rather serious and smiles very little. But then, finally there he was in a light role, he smiled and showed his teeth in wide grins. Believe it or not, in the bath scene, I find his suddenly flashing grin much more attractive than any other parts displayed. 

I love the first section of the film where the character of Richard Courtois is introduced. He only sees what he wants to see, and he does not see the obvious. He insists in believing that the crow is a raven and therefore stands for bad luck. He romanticises country life ("Country life, I find that charming!" Oops!) and sees a sanctuary where there is a whorehouse. 

One of my favorite comedy scenes is when he orders a meal in the manner of Sally (sans Harry), and the landlady concludes when he closes: "No sausage." Great timing. 

BTW, what do you think of the idea that he is a kind of Charles Bingley character in this one? 

(Trina) in the black leather pants and those strange, held-together-with-string jackets.
Definitely one keepsake-worthy outfit. An equivalent to the grey sleeping combination in FP. I think I would apply for the shirt, pressed to his ribs by the jacket-with-a-string. 

Karen:
(Trina) On my tape, it seems like there's dialogue bleeped out...Is that just a defect or is it bleeped out in the American version?
Perhaps it is a defect on the American version. I checked mine out and saw what you did. He definitely says something, but I couldn't make it out. Looked like Jeez or Jeepers. I think we'll need a HOTPIG owner or a certified lipreader to clear this mess up. It didn't look like anything that would need to be bleeped out. 

(Trina) The Seigneur's seriously dysfunctional family.
LOL! Excellent description. Without them, we wouldn't have a movie, now, would we? 

(Trina) All the scenes when RC is roaming around at night in the black leather pants and those strange, held-together-with-string jackets.
Much more important were those "held-together-with-string" pants. How else would Filette be able to reach in as easily as she did in that hallway! 

Speaking of clothing (in my role as Wardrobe Mistress), I do have a gripe. I read that men wore "excessively short tunics which, according to one chronicler's complaint, revealed the buttocks and 'other parts of the body that should be hidden', exciting the mockery of the common people." While we are given several other eyefuls, I think this movie would have far better had they shortened those tunics! 

(Trina) the bawdy street play...[and] The exchange with the priest. Courtois: "There must be priests in Hell." Priest: "You can't move for them."
Actually, this movie is right on target in its portrayal of the corruption and immoral goings on in the church at that time (no offense). The street play, called a fabliaux is representative and "was as welcome in the castle as in the town, tavern and probably cloister." 

Nan:
I would like to be the keeper of his hats (I have a weakness for them, ya see). I like the bubbly one he wears in the courtroom scenes, but I really like that big, floppy, velvety one he wears at the beginning. I may regret this question, but does anyone know what those hats are called? ;-p 

Arami:
(Nan) that big, floppy, velvety one...does anyone know what those hats are called?
It is either a turban hood or its development, a chaperon (the big floppy one with a piece hanging on one side). The courtroom headgear is probably a coif. 

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